Is The Basset Hound Right For Me?

* Picture taken from http://www.dailypuppy.com

*
Picture taken from http://www.dailypuppy.com

From the desk of Sharda Baker.

Hi and Welcome Everyone!

This is Sharda with another Basset Hound newsletter!

Your mind maybe wondering: “Is The Basset Hound Right For Me?”

Let me help you in answering that question, shall we?

Choosing a Basset Hound for a companion seems an easy job but you have to consider your personality, your working hours, your home and family and the time you can give to the pet before you buy one.

But if you have decided to take in a Basset Hound, how can you be sure that this is the right one for you?

As always, you need to know his nature and his personality before you plump for him.

FIRST, LET’S START WITH THE GOOD NEWS

He is a mild-mannered dog, gentle and loving.
He doesn’t throw any tantrums.
Males and females of the species get along well.
He also gets along with other dogs.
He loves to curl up with his owner.
He can be quite a funny guy and make you laugh
He can get along with your kids and kids too love him.
His IQ is pretty high.
He can be a good friend.
He rarely panics or gets nervous.
He is not aggressive.
He is a good watchdog.
His barking can actually prevent thieves from breaking into a home.
He can be active and can have fun with lively kids.

REASONS WHY YOU SHOULDN’T BUY A BASSET HOUND:

His barking or baying may not sound attractive.
Females of the species find it tough to whelp and raise a litter.
He has large stools.
He loves to chew, so be careful.
He can get pretty fat as an adult so feed him with care.
His ears require special care. They must be wiped after meals.
His eyes need attention and sometimes even medication.
His drool is bad. Enter a Basset Hound owner’s home and you could see drool marks everywhere. Invest in a good vacuum cleaner and watch out for that Persian carpet.
He can get bored easily.
He demands attention.
He needs to be on a leash when he is away from home and in a fenced yard at home.
Housetraining is a longer process.
He can be stubborn which may lead you to think he is not very intelligent. But the truth is, unlike some breeds which are absolutely obedient and look for their master’s commands and approval every time, this one has a mind of his own. Pleasing you is not important to him.
He also sheds a lot, so think about it. If you are fastidious about your living conditions, this could be a problem. His hair will come off easily every time you stroke him and you might find hair on your carpets.

BUT THE BASSET HOUND IS AN IDEAL FAMILY DOG

Here’s why:

He is even tempered and does not fly into a rage or throw tantrums.
He is gentle, loyal and affectionate.
He is known to get along with all other kids or pets.
He is alert to strangers.
He won’t bite or nip and is safe with kids.
He enjoys quiet moments at his master’s feet.
A Basset Hound can live in either a house or an apartment.
And he loves being part of a family. He likes company and being around people. He isn’t a loner so you can’t leave him alone for too long or he will howl till you return home.

WHAT’S THE REAL BASSET HOUND PERSONALITY?

A Basset Dog has a very distinct character. While some of the species are very energetic, others are relaxed and easygoing.

You could very easily find a Basset Hound that just likes to clown around and play the fool or he could be the serious type who still makes you laugh anyway with his funny expressions!

No matter what his personal quirks are, there are some temperament traits common to all Basset Hounds.

But before you go any further, let me tell you that all Basset Hounds have a stubborn streak and a sweet nature.

Your pet won’t be a mean, biting dog but sweet-tempered.

He will never feel the need to show off his brute strength and mark his territory as males of other breeds.

But both the male and female of this breed are very friendly and easy to get along with.

That’s it for today, hope you learned something today.

I’ll be back for more information about the Basset Hounds.

Until then!

All the best and take care.

Warmly,

Sharda Baker